For dyndns junkies

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For dyndns junkies

Samba - linux mailing list
#! /bin/sh

IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)


So many good things available out there that I am yet to find.  This
one courtesy of:

   https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git


a

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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Hi Andrew,

On Mon, 21 Aug 2017 20:10:11 +1000 Andrew Janke via linux <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)

This one may be closer/faster for many here (blowing our own orn :-)):

wget -O - http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml -o /dev/null

Also for those who prefer curl:

curl -s http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml

Also if you want to ensure you find your IPv4 address (in case you have
IPv6), just add "-4" to either of the above (or the original for that
matter).

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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The Signal Co. also run an IP site. (Disclaimer: I work there!)

wget -O - https <http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml>://gimmeip.fyi -o /dev/null

You can also add ?json or ?xml to the URL to get the IP in those formats.


On Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 9:41 PM, Stephen Rothwell via linux <
[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hi Andrew,
>
> On Mon, 21 Aug 2017 20:10:11 +1000 Andrew Janke via linux <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>
> This one may be closer/faster for many here (blowing our own orn :-)):
>
> wget -O - http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml -o /dev/null
>
> Also for those who prefer curl:
>
> curl -s http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml
>
> Also if you want to ensure you find your IPv4 address (in case you have
> IPv6), just add "-4" to either of the above (or the original for that
> matter).
>
> --
> Cheers,
> Stephen Rothwell
>
> --
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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 21/08/17 22:35, Miller-Kelly, Cody via linux wrote:

> The Signal Co. also run an IP site. (Disclaimer: I work there!)
>
> wget -O - https <http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml>://gimmeip.fyi -o /dev/null
>
> You can also add ?json or ?xml to the URL to get the IP in those formats.
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 9:41 PM, Stephen Rothwell via linux <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Hi Andrew,
>>
>> On Mon, 21 Aug 2017 20:10:11 +1000 Andrew Janke via linux <
>> [hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>>
>> This one may be closer/faster for many here (blowing our own orn :-)):
>>
>> wget -O - http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml -o /dev/null
>>
>> Also for those who prefer curl:
>>
>> curl -s http://ozlabs.org/myip.shtml
>>
>> Also if you want to ensure you find your IPv4 address (in case you have
>> IPv6), just add "-4" to either of the above (or the original for that
>> matter).

And a third option:-
wget -O - https://scottferguson.com.au/IP/yourIP.php -o /dev/null
curl https://scottferguson.com.au/IP/yourIP.php

cat yourIP.php
<?php echo $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; ?>

<snipped>


Kind regards

--
    A: Because we read from top to bottom, left to right.
    Q: Why should I start my reply below the quoted text?

    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

    A: The lost context.
    Q: What makes top-posted replies harder to read than bottom-posted?

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    Q: Should I trim down the quoted part of an email to which I'm reply

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 21/08/17 20:10, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:

> #! /bin/sh
>
> IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>
>
> So many good things available out there that I am yet to find.  This
> one courtesy of:
>
>    https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git
>
>
> a
>

I'd just say be careful - transparent proxying and NAT means that
the IP(v4) address that an HTTP service sees may well be quite different
than what some other protocol might see, or the IP(v4) that you
are using to offer public-facing services.

I had a colleague trying to SSH to a server I maintain from an
ISP-connected machine in Singapore. He gave me his IP(v4) address
which he found from a web-based service so that I could allow it
for SSH access.

The IP(v4) that his SSH was using was completely different. I had to
convince him to SSH into another server and type:
echo $SSH_CLIENT
which revealed the actual (probably NAT'd) IP(v4) he was using.

ymmv,

Bob Edwards.

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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Hi Scott,

On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:42:59 +1000 Scott Ferguson via linux <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> cat yourIP.php
> <?php echo $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; ?>

I am just old school (;-):

$ cat myip.shtml
<!--#echo var="REMOTE_ADDR" -->
$ cat .htaccess
Options +Includes

I was going for minimum impact on the server ...
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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 21/08/17 20:10, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:

> #! /bin/sh
>
> IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>
>
> So many good things available out there that I am yet to find.  This
> one courtesy of:
>
>    https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git
>
>
> a
>

Of course, you can also run your own dyndns service, as I do as
as sub-domain of my own domain, for multiple devices.

(side-story: turns out that it is cheaper to hire a VPS in a
data-center in Sydney, with a static IPv4 address, than it is to
get a static IPv4 address on NBN...)

In this case, I use an SSH forced-command on my publicly-facing
server to run a script which uses the client IP(v4) address and
nsupdate to update the bind DNS server.

The client just does this (regularly, in a cron job):
ssh -i <some key> -p $PORT $USER@$MY_DYNDNS_SERVICE nsupdate.sh

and the server has this script (called from another script which
does all the SSH sanity checking):

#!/bin/bash
# by Robert (Bob) Edwards, May 2017

MYNAME="my-name.dyn.example.org"
NSKEYFILE="/path/to/a_key.+157+24468.private"
SERVER=1.2.3.4
TTL=300

read IPADDR OUTPORT INPORT <<< $SSH_CLIENT

echo "IP address is $IPADDR"

cat << EOF | nsupdate -k ${NSKEYFILE}
server $SERVER
update add $MYNAME $TTL A $IPADDR
send
quit
EOF

And one more comment: using VPNs means that I don't actually care
that much anymore what my dynamic IP address is.

cheers,

Bob Edwards.

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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> Of course, you can also run your own dyndns service, as I do as
> as sub-domain of my own domain, for multiple devices.
>
> In this case, I use an SSH forced-command on my publicly-facing
> server to run a script which uses the client IP(v4) address and
> nsupdate to update the bind DNS server.

I've often wondered about getting my own VPS but have never got over
the initial inertia required to hand of CC details. For now I use
dyndns and host from home. Not the best security wise, but so be it.
If nothing else I am 99.999999999% sure of what logs are and aren't
kept on things I run.


a

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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>
> I've often wondered about getting my own VPS



A server I booted on Google Cloud Platform back in April has been running
faultlessly on its fixed IP since then. As of this afternoon, it has used
up five cents of the AU$396.78 (US$300) free dev account that Google will
give to anyone who asks. The instance just hosts Postgres and Quassel-core
to keep my access to IRC channels going 24/7.

So on average, I'm spending around one cent per month (of Google's money)
to keep a cloud server running.

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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> A server I booted on Google Cloud Platform back in April has been running
> faultlessly on its fixed IP since then. As of this afternoon, it has used up
> five cents of the AU$396.78 (US$300) free dev account that Google will give
> to anyone who asks. The instance just hosts Postgres and Quassel-core to
> keep my access to IRC channels going 24/7.

Well that got my attention.

And I see the $300 credit is now a button.

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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In reply to this post by Samba - linux mailing list
On 22/08/17 13:06, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:

>> Of course, you can also run your own dyndns service, as I do as
>> as sub-domain of my own domain, for multiple devices.
>>
>> In this case, I use an SSH forced-command on my publicly-facing
>> server to run a script which uses the client IP(v4) address and
>> nsupdate to update the bind DNS server.
>
> I've often wondered about getting my own VPS but have never got over
> the initial inertia required to hand of CC details. For now I use
> dyndns and host from home. Not the best security wise, but so be it.
> If nothing else I am 99.999999999% sure of what logs are and aren't
> kept on things I run.
>
>
> a
>

Wow! That is a lot of 9s! What country was your CPU chip manufactured
in? (assuming you didn't wire your own from transistors you baked
from sand yourself...).

I keep some low-care services running on my VPS, such as a minetest
server, as well as my DNS server and a few other things (gotta get
value for money from that 25GB of SSD and 1GB RAM...).

Then I use a VPN to send traffic for higher-care services to servers
running at home. Not sure that the logs on those servers are 11 9's
secure, but likely much harder to get at than any logs on the VPS.

As for CC details, I use the same one to pay for my VPS as I use for
my NBN connection. Not sure I trust either more than the other...

cheers,

Bob Edwards.


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Re: For dyndns junkies

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In reply to this post by Samba - linux mailing list


On 22/08/17 13:21, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:
>> A server I booted on Google Cloud Platform back in April has been running
>> faultlessly on its fixed IP since then. As of this afternoon, it has used up
>> five cents of the AU$396.78 (US$300) free dev account that Google will give
>> to anyone who asks. The instance just hosts Postgres and Quassel-core to
>> keep my access to IRC channels going 24/7.
>
> Well that got my attention.
>
> And I see the $300 credit is now a button.

https://cloud.google.com/free/

>
> a
>

Amazon also offer a similar deal - 12 month free account.
https://aws.amazon.com/free/
However the Google Cloud offer (reportedly) has better performance
https://bblank.thinkmo.de/network-caps-in-cloud-environments.html

better than Azure also...
https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/?cdn=disable

https://lowendbox.com/ has a good list of cheap VPS providers. Both
Digital Ocean and Vultr offer VPS hosting in Australia and good deals at
around $10US pm - but many people require much less than what those
deals provide. So if you pool resources with trusted friends you can get
a useful VPS for the price of a loaf of cheap bread per month.


Kind regards

--
    A: Because we read from top to bottom, left to right.
    Q: Why should I start my reply below the quoted text?

    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

    A: The lost context.
    Q: What makes top-posted replies harder to read than bottom-posted?

    A: Yes.
    Q: Should I trim down the quoted part of an email to which I'm reply

http://www.idallen.com/topposting.html

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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In reply to this post by Samba - linux mailing list
Re-sending to list - apologies to Stephen for the misdirected reply

On 22/08/17 11:06, Stephen Rothwell wrote:

> Hi Scott,
>
> On Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:42:59 +1000 Scott Ferguson via linux <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> cat yourIP.php
>> <?php echo $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; ?>
>
> I am just old school (;-):
>
> $ cat myip.shtml
> <!--#echo var="REMOTE_ADDR" -->
> $ cat .htaccess
> Options +Includes
>
> I was going for minimum impact on the server ...


Hmmm. Which has prompted me to monitor the load on that page - having
just made the address public. I no longer use the resource - partially
for the reasons Bob mentioned, but mainly because I can outsource the
task to a more reliable service:-
curl https://www.google.com.au/search?q=what+is+my+ip|grep "Client IP
address:"



Kind regards


--
    A: Because we read from top to bottom, left to right.
    Q: Why should I start my reply below the quoted text?

    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

    A: The lost context.
    Q: What makes top-posted replies harder to read than bottom-posted?

    A: Yes.
    Q: Should I trim down the quoted part of an email to which I'm reply

http://www.idallen.com/topposting.html

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 22 August 2017 at 13:40, Scott Ferguson via linux <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> https://lowendbox.com/ has a good list of cheap VPS providers. Both
> Digital Ocean and Vultr offer VPS hosting in Australia and good deals at
> around $10US pm - but many people require much less than what those
> deals provide. So if you pool resources with trusted friends you can get
> a useful VPS for the price of a loaf of cheap bread per month.
>

Nicely put.  Just a minor correction: Digital Ocean doesn't actually host
in Australia - its closest location is Singapore. Vultr has Australian
hosting.
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Re: For dyndns junkies

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I love this idea and being a part of it excites me, thanks!

My home ip is behind an isp nat. How do all of you recommend I ssh to a
server in my house via the vps with some known, public addressable IP?
ssh reverse proxy?



On 22 Aug. 2017 12:14 pm, "Bob Edwards via linux" <[hidden email]>
wrote:

> On 21/08/17 20:10, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:
>
>> #! /bin/sh
>>
>> IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>>
>>
>> So many good things available out there that I am yet to find.  This
>> one courtesy of:
>>
>>    https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git
>>
>>
>> a
>>
>>
> Of course, you can also run your own dyndns service, as I do as
> as sub-domain of my own domain, for multiple devices.
>
> (side-story: turns out that it is cheaper to hire a VPS in a
> data-center in Sydney, with a static IPv4 address, than it is to
> get a static IPv4 address on NBN...)
>
> In this case, I use an SSH forced-command on my publicly-facing
> server to run a script which uses the client IP(v4) address and
> nsupdate to update the bind DNS server.
>
> The client just does this (regularly, in a cron job):
> ssh -i <some key> -p $PORT $USER@$MY_DYNDNS_SERVICE nsupdate.sh
>
> and the server has this script (called from another script which
> does all the SSH sanity checking):
>
> #!/bin/bash
> # by Robert (Bob) Edwards, May 2017
>
> MYNAME="my-name.dyn.example.org"
> NSKEYFILE="/path/to/a_key.+157+24468.private"
> SERVER=1.2.3.4
> TTL=300
>
> read IPADDR OUTPORT INPORT <<< $SSH_CLIENT
>
> echo "IP address is $IPADDR"
>
> cat << EOF | nsupdate -k ${NSKEYFILE}
> server $SERVER
> update add $MYNAME $TTL A $IPADDR
> send
> quit
> EOF
>
> And one more comment: using VPNs means that I don't actually care
> that much anymore what my dynamic IP address is.
>
> cheers,
>
> Bob Edwards.
>
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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 22/08/17 14:19, Hal Ashburner wrote:
> I love this idea and being a part of it excites me, thanks!
>
> My home ip is behind an isp nat. How do all of you recommend I ssh to a
> server in my house via the vps with some known, public addressable IP?
> ssh reverse proxy?
>

OpenVPN, in "road-warrior" mode, running on your VPS. Have it listen on
a port other than 22 so that you can differentiate SSH to the VPS and
SSH to your home server.

cheers,

Bob Edwards.

>
>
> On 22 Aug. 2017 12:14 pm, "Bob Edwards via linux" <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     On 21/08/17 20:10, Andrew Janke via linux wrote:
>
>         #! /bin/sh
>
>         IP=$(wget -O - http://icanhazip.com/ -o /dev/null)
>
>
>         So many good things available out there that I am yet to find.  This
>         one courtesy of:
>
>            https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git
>         <https://github.com/AntonioCS/no-ip.com-bash-updater.git>
>
>
>         a
>
>
>     Of course, you can also run your own dyndns service, as I do as
>     as sub-domain of my own domain, for multiple devices.
>
>     (side-story: turns out that it is cheaper to hire a VPS in a
>     data-center in Sydney, with a static IPv4 address, than it is to
>     get a static IPv4 address on NBN...)
>
>     In this case, I use an SSH forced-command on my publicly-facing
>     server to run a script which uses the client IP(v4) address and
>     nsupdate to update the bind DNS server.
>
>     The client just does this (regularly, in a cron job):
>     ssh -i <some key> -p $PORT $USER@$MY_DYNDNS_SERVICE nsupdate.sh
>
>     and the server has this script (called from another script which
>     does all the SSH sanity checking):
>
>     #!/bin/bash
>     # by Robert (Bob) Edwards, May 2017
>
>     MYNAME="my-name.dyn.example.org <http://my-name.dyn.example.org>"
>     NSKEYFILE="/path/to/a_key.+157+24468.private"
>     SERVER=1.2.3.4
>     TTL=300
>
>     read IPADDR OUTPORT INPORT <<< $SSH_CLIENT
>
>     echo "IP address is $IPADDR"
>
>     cat << EOF | nsupdate -k ${NSKEYFILE}
>     server $SERVER
>     update add $MYNAME $TTL A $IPADDR
>     send
>     quit
>     EOF
>
>     And one more comment: using VPNs means that I don't actually care
>     that much anymore what my dynamic IP address is.
>
>     cheers,
>
>     Bob Edwards.
>
>     --
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>     <https://lists.samba.org/mailman/listinfo/linux>
>


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Re: For dyndns junkies

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In reply to this post by Samba - linux mailing list
On 22/08/17 13:40, Scott Ferguson via linux wrote:

> https://cloud.google.com/free/
>
> Amazon also offer a similar deal - 12 month free account.
> https://aws.amazon.com/free/
> However the Google Cloud offer (reportedly) has better performance
> https://bblank.thinkmo.de/network-caps-in-cloud-environments.html
>
> better than Azure also...
> https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/?cdn=disable
>
> https://lowendbox.com/ has a good list of cheap VPS providers. Both
> Digital Ocean and Vultr offer VPS hosting in Australia and good deals at
> around $10US pm - but many people require much less than what those
> deals provide. So if you pool resources with trusted friends you can get
> a useful VPS for the price of a loaf of cheap bread per month.
>
>
> Kind regards
>

With all these "free" and low-cost VPS offerings, all with static IPs,
it makes one wonder if the world really is running out of IPv4 address
space, or if it all hasn't been gobbled up by these big VPS providers...

cheers,

Bob Edwards.

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Re: For dyndns junkies

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On 22/08/17 14:33, Bob Edwards via linux wrote:

> On 22/08/17 13:40, Scott Ferguson via linux wrote:
>> https://cloud.google.com/free/
>>
>> Amazon also offer a similar deal - 12 month free account.
>> https://aws.amazon.com/free/
>> However the Google Cloud offer (reportedly) has better performance
>> https://bblank.thinkmo.de/network-caps-in-cloud-environments.html
>>
>> better than Azure also...
>> https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/?cdn=disable
>>
>> https://lowendbox.com/ has a good list of cheap VPS providers. Both
>> Digital Ocean and Vultr offer VPS hosting in Australia and good deals at
>> around $10US pm - but many people require much less than what those
>> deals provide. So if you pool resources with trusted friends you can get
>> a useful VPS for the price of a loaf of cheap bread per month.
>>
>>
>> Kind regards
>>
>
> With all these "free" and low-cost VPS offerings, all with static IPs,
> it makes one wonder if the world really is running out of IPv4 address
> space, or if it all hasn't been gobbled up by these big VPS providers...
>
> cheers,
>
> Bob Edwards.


Wonder no more(?)
[quote]
When looking at the assigned IP blocks at IANA (Internet Assigned
Numbers Authority), what becomes immediately clear is that the US
Department of Defense has a significant number of large IP blocks. We
only looked at /8 IP blocks, the largest blocks you can get, and there
are 12 of them assigned to the US DoD and related organizations. Each /8
block holds 16,777,214 IP addresses, so the DoD have in effect allocated
more than 200 million IP addresses. That should hold them for a while.

The closest any other corporation comes to this are Level 3
Communications and Hewlett-Packard, with two /8 blocks each. The
DoD-owned IP blocks together with the 26 corporations and universities
who have their own /8 blocks hold more than 671 million IP addresses.

These were all early land grabs, most of them made between 1991 and 1995.

Some notables among the companies with one /8 IP block are Apple (but no
Microsoft in sight[Note: later they bought Nortels. ScottF]), IBM,
Halliburton and the Ford Motor Company.
Companies and organizations with IPv4 /8 blocks from IANA Owner Blocks
~IP addresses
US Military (Department of Defense etc.) 12 201 million
Level 3 Communications, Inc. 2 33 million
Hewlett-Packard 2 33 million
AT&T Bell Laboratories (Alcatel-Lucent) 1 16 million
AT&T Global Network Services 1 16 million
Bell-Northern Research (Nortel Networks) 1 16 million
Amateur Radio Digital Communications 1 16 million
Apple Computer Inc. 1 16 million
Cap Debis CCS (Mercedes-Benz) 1 16 million
Computer Sciences Corporation 1 16 million
Deparment of Social Security of UK 1 16 million
E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. 1 16 million
Eli Lily and Company 1 16 million
Ford Motor Company 1 16 million
General Electric Company 1 16 million
Halliburton Company 1 16 million
IBM 1 16 million
Interop Show Network 1 16 million
Merck and Co., Inc. 1 16 million
MERIT Computer Network 1 16 million
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 16 million
Performance Systems International (Cogent) 1 16 million
Prudential Equity Group, LLC 1 16 million
Société Internationale De Telecommunications Aeronautiques 1 16 million
U.S. Postal Service 1 16 million
UK Ministry of Defence 1 16 million
Xerox Corporation 1 16 million
        40 671 million

The table doesn’t include the blocks allocated for RIRs and other
special purposes.

One thing that strikes you is the low number of ISPs on this list. This
is most likely due to their late appearance on the internet when it was
harder to reserve big IP blocks, forcing them to settle for smaller blocks.

That the US Department of Defense has such a huge amount of the IPv4
address space is partly due to historical reasons: They developed the
internet in the first place (ARPANET) and have a strong vested interest
in the evolution of the internet.
[/quote]
http://royal.pingdom.com/2008/02/13/where-did-all-the-ip-numbers-go-the-us-department-of-defense-has-them/

Apparently ARIN don't own the IPV4 addresses:-
http://www.internetgovernance.org/2012/09/22/its-official-legacy-ipv4-address-block-holders-own-their-number-blocks/

...hence they are bought and sold:-
http://www.networkworld.com/article/2228854/microsoft-subnet/microsoft-pays-nortel--7-5-million-for-ipv4-addresses.html

and of course:-
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_assigned_/8_IPv4_address_blocks


Kind regards



--
    A: Because we read from top to bottom, left to right.
    Q: Why should I start my reply below the quoted text?

    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing?

    A: The lost context.
    Q: What makes top-posted replies harder to read than bottom-posted?

    A: Yes.
    Q: Should I trim down the quoted part of an email to which I'm reply

http://www.idallen.com/topposting.html

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Re: For dyndns junkies

Samba - linux mailing list
On 22/08/17 15:35, Scott Ferguson via linux wrote:

>
>
> On 22/08/17 14:33, Bob Edwards via linux wrote:
>> On 22/08/17 13:40, Scott Ferguson via linux wrote:
>>> https://cloud.google.com/free/
>>>
>>> Amazon also offer a similar deal - 12 month free account.
>>> https://aws.amazon.com/free/
>>> However the Google Cloud offer (reportedly) has better performance
>>> https://bblank.thinkmo.de/network-caps-in-cloud-environments.html
>>>
>>> better than Azure also...
>>> https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/free/?cdn=disable
>>>
>>> https://lowendbox.com/ has a good list of cheap VPS providers. Both
>>> Digital Ocean and Vultr offer VPS hosting in Australia and good deals at
>>> around $10US pm - but many people require much less than what those
>>> deals provide. So if you pool resources with trusted friends you can get
>>> a useful VPS for the price of a loaf of cheap bread per month.
>>>
>>>
>>> Kind regards
>>>
>>
>> With all these "free" and low-cost VPS offerings, all with static IPs,
>> it makes one wonder if the world really is running out of IPv4 address
>> space, or if it all hasn't been gobbled up by these big VPS providers...
>>
>> cheers,
>>
>> Bob Edwards.
>
>
> Wonder no more(?)
> [quote]
> When looking at the assigned IP blocks at IANA (Internet Assigned
> Numbers Authority), what becomes immediately clear is that the US
> Department of Defense has a significant number of large IP blocks. We
> only looked at /8 IP blocks, the largest blocks you can get, and there
> are 12 of them assigned to the US DoD and related organizations. Each /8
> block holds 16,777,214 IP addresses, so the DoD have in effect allocated
> more than 200 million IP addresses. That should hold them for a while.
>
> The closest any other corporation comes to this are Level 3
> Communications and Hewlett-Packard, with two /8 blocks each. The
> DoD-owned IP blocks together with the 26 corporations and universities
> who have their own /8 blocks hold more than 671 million IP addresses.
>
> These were all early land grabs, most of them made between 1991 and 1995.
>
> Some notables among the companies with one /8 IP block are Apple (but no
> Microsoft in sight[Note: later they bought Nortels. ScottF]), IBM,
> Halliburton and the Ford Motor Company.
> Companies and organizations with IPv4 /8 blocks from IANA Owner Blocks
> ~IP addresses
> US Military (Department of Defense etc.) 12 201 million
> Level 3 Communications, Inc. 2 33 million
> Hewlett-Packard 2 33 million
> AT&T Bell Laboratories (Alcatel-Lucent) 1 16 million
> AT&T Global Network Services 1 16 million
> Bell-Northern Research (Nortel Networks) 1 16 million
> Amateur Radio Digital Communications 1 16 million
> Apple Computer Inc. 1 16 million
> Cap Debis CCS (Mercedes-Benz) 1 16 million
> Computer Sciences Corporation 1 16 million
> Deparment of Social Security of UK 1 16 million
> E.I. duPont de Nemours and Co., Inc. 1 16 million
> Eli Lily and Company 1 16 million
> Ford Motor Company 1 16 million
> General Electric Company 1 16 million
> Halliburton Company 1 16 million
> IBM 1 16 million
> Interop Show Network 1 16 million
> Merck and Co., Inc. 1 16 million
> MERIT Computer Network 1 16 million
> Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1 16 million
> Performance Systems International (Cogent) 1 16 million
> Prudential Equity Group, LLC 1 16 million
> Société Internationale De Telecommunications Aeronautiques 1 16 million
> U.S. Postal Service 1 16 million
> UK Ministry of Defence 1 16 million
> Xerox Corporation 1 16 million
> 40 671 million
>
> The table doesn’t include the blocks allocated for RIRs and other
> special purposes.
>
> One thing that strikes you is the low number of ISPs on this list. This
> is most likely due to their late appearance on the internet when it was
> harder to reserve big IP blocks, forcing them to settle for smaller blocks.
>
> That the US Department of Defense has such a huge amount of the IPv4
> address space is partly due to historical reasons: They developed the
> internet in the first place (ARPANET) and have a strong vested interest
> in the evolution of the internet.
> [/quote]
> http://royal.pingdom.com/2008/02/13/where-did-all-the-ip-numbers-go-the-us-department-of-defense-has-them/
>
> Apparently ARIN don't own the IPV4 addresses:-
> http://www.internetgovernance.org/2012/09/22/its-official-legacy-ipv4-address-block-holders-own-their-number-blocks/
>
> ...hence they are bought and sold:-
> http://www.networkworld.com/article/2228854/microsoft-subnet/microsoft-pays-nortel--7-5-million-for-ipv4-addresses.html
>
> and of course:-
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_assigned_/8_IPv4_address_blocks
>
>
> Kind regards
>
>
>


Thanks Scott.

As you point out, Microsoft has been "gobbling up" IPv4 address space...
(funny, 'cause in Window 3.1 days their esteemed leader saw no future
in the Internet and it's protocols...).

Bob Edwards.


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Re: For dyndns junkies

Samba - linux mailing list
Hey Bob:

> As you point out, Microsoft has been "gobbling up" IPv4 address space...
> (funny, 'cause in Window 3.1 days their esteemed leader saw no future
> in the Internet and it's protocols...).

In `89 I taught informatics at the now Edith Cowan Uni. Computer comms
wasn't taught!
--
www.netspeed.com.au/bryan/

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